Archive for the 'Related Events' Category

Upcoming Events for the Week of November 26, 2012: Randal Jelks, Lori Rotskoff, Bland Simpson, and More

This week, a busy month of civil rights related events comes to a close with several book talks and signings. Here are a few highlights from this week’s calendar:

Washington, DC—On Tuesday, November 27, 2012, Randal Maurice Jelks, author of Benjamin Elijah Mays, Schoolmaster of the Movement: A Biography, will give a book talk at Busboys and Poets.

Chicago, IL—On Thursday, November 29, 2012, Lori Rotskoff, co-editor of When We Were Free to Be: Looking Back at a Children’s Classic and the Difference It Made, will give a book talk at Women & Children First.

Beaufort, NC—Bland Simpson, author of Two Captains from Carolina: Moses Grandy, John Newland Maffitt, and the Coming of the Civil War, will spend Friday, November 30, 2012, in Beaufort. He will visit the North Carolina Maritime Museum at 12:00 and Scuttlebutt at 4:00.

For more information, and to see our full event calendar, click here.

Upcoming Events for the Week of November 12, 2012: Minorities in the 2012 Elections, Lori Rotskoff and Laura Lovett, and More

Community members across the country will have plenty of civil rights related events to choose from this week: book talks and signings, lectures by top-notch scholars, films about human rights and civil liberties, and more. Here are a few highlights from this week’s calendar:

Chapel Hill, NC—On Tuesday, November 13, 2012, Bland Simpson will visit the Bull’s Head Bookshop to discuss his new book, Two Captains from Carolina: Moses Grandy, John Newland Maffitt, and the Coming of the Civil War.

Durham, NC—On Wednesday, November 14, 2012, as part of the “Citizenship, Democracy, Elections” series, American political pollster, opinion leader, and author John Zogby will present a lecture at Duke University: “Did Minorities Matter? Their Impact on the 2012 Elections.”

New York, NY—On Wednesday, November 14, 2012, Lori Rotskoff and Laura L. Lovett will give a book talk and signing at the 92nd Street Y in Tribeca. In their new book, When We Were Free to Be: Looking Back at a Children’s Classic and the Difference It Made, thirty-two contributors explore the creation and legacy of the popular children’s classic Free to Be . . . You and Me, the groundbreaking children’s record, book, and television special that debuted forty years ago.

Jacksonville, IL—On Friday, November 16, 2012, C. Joseph Genetin-Pilawa will give a book talk at Our Town Books. Genetin-Pilawa’s recent book, Crooked Paths to Allotment: The Fight over Federal Indian Policy after the Civil War, examines the contests over Indian policy from Reconstruction through the Gilded Age, revealing the contingent state of American settler colonialism and showing how the ideas and policy frameworks espoused by reformers and activists—though repressed by assimilationists—established a tradition of dissent against disruptive colonial governance.

For more information, and to see our full event calendar, click here.

Upcoming Events for the Week of November 5, 2012: Race, Gender, and Sexuality, Book Signings, and More

Community members across the country will have plenty of civil rights related events to choose from this month: book talks and signings, lectures by top-notch scholars, films about human rights and civil liberties, and more. Here are a few highlights from this week’s calendar:

Chapel Hill, NC—On Wednesday, November 7, 2012, Jean Dennison, author of Colonial Entanglement: Constituting a Twenty-First-Century Osage Nation, will give a book talk at the Bull’s Head Bookshop. Situating the 2004-2006 Osage Nation reform process within its historical and current contexts, Dennison illustrates how the Osage have creatively responded to continuing assaults on their nationhood.

Durham, NC—On Thursday, November 8, 2012, Duke University will present Everyday Racism, Everyday Homophobia: A Symposium on the Intersections of Race, Gender, and Sexuality.

Sacramento, CA—On Saturday, November 10, 2012, William J. Bauer, Jr., author of We Were All Like Migrant Workers Here: Work, Community, and Memory on California’s Round Valley Reservation, 1850-1941, will give a book talk at the State Indian Museum – California Indian Heritage Center. Drawing on oral history interviews, Bauer brings Round Valley Indian voices to the forefront in a narrative that traces their adaptations to shifting social and economic realities, first within unfree labor systems, including outright slavery and debt peonage, and later as wage laborers within the agricultural workforce.

For more information, and to see our full event calendar, click here.

Upcoming Events for the Week of October 29, 2012: Colors of Confinement, The Loving Story, and More

Community members across the country will have plenty of civil rights related events to choose from this month: book talks and signings, lectures by top-notch scholars, films about human rights and civil liberties, and more. Here are a few highlights from this week’s calendar:

Chapel Hill, NC—On Tuesday, October 30, 2012, Dr. Beverly Guy-Sheftall, a women’s studies movement scholar and professor, will present the 20th Annual Sonja Haynes Stone Memorial Lecture.

Washington, DC—On Thursday, November 1, 2012, Eric Muller, editor of Colors of Confinement: Rare Kodachrome Photographs of Japanese American Incarceration in World War II, will hold a presentation and signing at the National Archives and Records Administration. Muller’s book, published in August, showcases sixty-five stunning images from an extremely rare collection of color photographs, along with interpretive essays by scholars and a reflective essay by a former internee.

Chapel Hill, NC—On Thursday, November 1, 2012, UNC Chapel Hill’s Stone Center will hold a lunchtime film screening and discussion of The Loving Story, which chronicles the trial of Mildred and Richard Loving, which eventually struck down laws against interracial marriage. (For more on the Loving trial, check out this blog post.)

For more information, and to see our full event calendar, click here.

Upcoming Events for the Week of October 22, 2012: 20th Century Archives, Marian Wright Edelman, and More

Community members across the country will have plenty of civil rights related events to choose from this month: book talks and signings, lectures by top-notch scholars, films about human rights and civil liberties, and more. Here are a few highlights from this week’s calendar:

Chapel Hill, NC—On Tuesday, October 23, 2012, there will be a brown bag lunch discussion entitled “Twentieth Century North Carolina Civil Rights in the Archives: Materials in the Reading Room and Online.”

Durham, NC—On Thursday, October 25, 2012, Marian Wright Edelman will give the 2012 Crown Lecture in Ethics. Edelman, a civil rights activist, economic justice proponent, and Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient who founded the Children’s Defense Fund, will discuss income disparity and the state of America’s poor children.

Los Angeles, CA—On Thursday, October 25, 2012, the four UCLA ethnic studies centers will host a panel discussion on the upcoming election: “Inside Out: Social Justice, Activism, and the 2012 Vote.

For more information, and to see our full event calendar, click here.

Upcoming Events for the Week of October 15, 2012: Education Disparity, Religious Liberty, and More

Community members across the country will have plenty of civil rights related events to choose from this month: book talks and signings, lectures by top-notch scholars, films about human rights and civil liberties, and more. Here are a few highlights from this week’s calendar:

Memphis, Tennessee—On Wednesday, October 17, 2012, the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel will hold its October Lunch & Learn. Josh Edelman, Senior Program Officer for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation on the Empowering Effective Teachers team, will discuss education disparity.

Raleigh, North Carolina—On Thursday, October 18, 2012, Paul Harvey, co-author of The Color of Christ: The Son of God and the Saga of Race in America, will give a book talk at NC State University’s Department of Religion. Harvey and co-author Edward Blum illustrate how the image of Jesus Christ has been used both to justify the atrocities of white supremacy and to inspire the righteousness of civil rights crusades.

Washington, D.C.—On Thursday, October 18, 2012, the Newseum will hold a screening and discussion of the documentary film First Freedom: The Fight for Religious Liberty, which discusses freedom of conscience as a legally protected human right. A panel discussion, led by Nina Totenberg of NPR, about religious liberty will follow the screening.

For more information, and to see our full event calendar, click here.

Celebrating Freedom’s Teacher, the Enhanced E-book

Two weeks ago, we announced the publication of a special enhanced e-book version of Freedom’s Teacher: The life of Septima Clark by Katherine Mellen Charron (click here). Produced in collaboration with the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture at the College of Charleston, the enhanced e-book features nearly 100 primary-source items, including photographs, documents, letters, newspaper clippings, and 60 audio excerpts from oral history interviews with 15 individuals—including Clark herself—each embedded in the narrative where it will be most meaningful. (See the bottom of this post for a video demonstration).

This week, the project team, the author, and professors and scholars of history celebrated the release of this exciting new product—a scholarly work which truly redefines the concept of the “talking book.” Here are a few informal photos from the event at The Crunkelton on West Franklin Street in Chapel Hill.

Left to right: UNC Press digital production specialist Thomas Elrod, LCRM project assistant Alison Shay, “Freedom’s Teacher” author Katherine Mellen Charron, and LCRM project director Sylvia Miller.

Adriane Lentz-Smith, Duke University’s Hunt Family Assistant Professor of History, poses with an enlarged version of the book cover.

Author Katherine Charron shows the enhanced e-book on an iPad to Duke University's Hunt Family Assistant Professor of History Adriane Lentz-Smith. Liz Lundeen, a PhD student of history at UNC Chapel Hill, watches.

A video demonstration of the enhanced e-book.

 

Browsable and searchable from anywhere in the text, the enhancements include transcripts, additional commentary from the author, and outbound links to online archives. The enhanced e-book is available for the Barnes & Noble Nook and the iPhone and iPad via Amazon’s Kindle app.

Check back for upcoming posts about the creation process, from the point of view of the author and project staff.

Mentoring a Movement

At the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 50th anniversary conference in 2009, the activists who as a group formed the tip of the spear in the segregated South, transforming the region with a rare combination of courage, organization, intellect, and creativity, gathered to reflect on their part of the civil rights movement. Civil rights luminaries like Bob Moses rubbed elbows with scholars like Taylor Branch. The event was, like SNCC itself, rich with emotion and intelligence. But as Sue Thrasher wrote after the conference, what was missing was a prescription for the future. “I didn’t sense much connection to work that is being done,” she wrote (read her full piece on the conference here).

Having built a movement in the 1960s and sustained it through the 1970s and beyond, it may be too much to ask that an aging generation continue to stoke the fire that burned in their youth, let alone light a fire for a new generation. The responsibility for sustaining the movement or building a new one lies with the generation that will experience the largest gap ever in wealth between old and young, and who are coming of age in a nation deeply divided by questions of faith and family, and far adrift on questions of education, the environment, and, of course, rights. This is a nation made great by wealth, made fat by wealth, made sick by wealth–and perhaps made great again by wealth if that wealth and its symptoms can be dragged into the light to inspire (or force) the legal, political, and economic reforms we so desperately need. If that happens, it will have to be accomplished by the new generation of anonymous young people who are gathering around the country as part of the movement now known as Occupy Wall Street.

But that doesn’t mean it should happen without input and support from the veterans among us. It was inspiring, therefore, to learn that Occupy Atlanta is consulting with activists like the Reverend Joseph Lowery and others as they seek their voice. At the same time, it is oddly troubling to see Jesse Jackson joining protestors in Atlanta. Jackson’s celebrity brings attention, certainly, but as we have quickly learned this is a movement capable of getting headlines without celebrity involvement, or even of generating its own celebrities–Jesse LaGreca has become the voice of the movement after smacking down Fox News in footage that went viral despite Fox’s choice not to broadcast it. (For the record, LaGreca is a longtime activist and writer, not just some guy in a funny hat who wandered into Zucotti Park.)

LaGreca’s deftness with language is invaluable because the media expects this sprawling protest to articulate their message on par with the machines they’re used to covering and can understand: the very political parties and corporations whose behavior, including their so-called messaging, has hollowed out America’s public life. For weeks, even journalists at the allegedly liberal NPR have set a high bar for protestors attempting to explain their demands, as if the repeated refrain of “economic justice” isn’t clear enough. Imagine if the media today was covering the civil rights movement of the 1960s. “What is it these people want? Is it desegregation or voting rights? Economic justice or women’s rights? It’s just a bunch of jerks with signs!”

With capable hands like LaGreca’s ready to take it, the civil rights movement generation should seize this opportunity to pass the torch; after all, it was the young people in the 1960s who learned from the radicals of the 1950s, and they from the radicals of the 1930s. (Not that civil rights heroes like Pete Seeger should stay home.) The most important way they can help? Messaging and media. Here’s hoping that Jackson, Lowery, and others will impart hard-earned lessons about message discipline. After all, the demands of the movement are certainly clearer than a credit default swap (I defy you to read this Wikipedia entry once, then explain it to a friend.) It’s certainly clearer than the labyrinth of non-regulations that will pour anonymous corporate money into our political process next year. I’ll take a dirty hippy over a SuperPAC any day.

 

Impact on Muslims at Home and Abroad

On Monday, September 12, Arif Alikhan, a former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security, will speak at 5 p.m. in the FedEx Global Education Center on Pittsboro Street in Chapel Hill. Afterward a panel discussion, “9/11 Ten Years Later: The Impact on Muslims at Home and Abroad,” will feature representatives of UNC, Duke and the Islamic Association of Raleigh.

For more information on UNC-Chapel Hill’s commemoration of the events of September 11, 2001, click here.

Gay Rights and the Black Community

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People held its first ever town hall meeting on LGBT issues at its 102nd annual meeting this week in Los Angeles. Moderated by Don Lemon, who recently came out publicly as gay, the discussion addressed the history of tension between the gay community and the black community. Lemon himself had this to say on the subject:

“[Being gay is] quite different for an African-American male,” he said. “It’s about the worst thing you can be in black culture. You’re taught you have to be a man; you have to be masculine. In the black community they think you can pray the gay away.” [Lemon] said he believed the negative reaction to male homosexuality had to do with the history of discrimination that still affects many black Americans, as well as the attitudes of some black women.

Julian Bond, the hugely influential civil rights leader, concurred, adding that the discrimination felt by gay African Americans is orders of magnitude worse than that experienced by their straight peers.

Read more and watch some video from the town hall here.