Archive for the 'Survey Results' Category

Librarian Survey Results: Coursepacks and Business Models

This is the final post in a 5-part series in which we will share some of the results of our survey for librarians with you. 120 librarians took the survey.

The penultimate section of the survey focused on the idea of an online coursepack service.  Although 77% of survey-takers thought that instructors would like to create a print coursepack or a digital cluster of related publications for courses using an LCRM online collection, interest was not particularly high in various features that we suggested, and comments indicated that professors would like to link to online resources for course use via Blackboard or a similar service but that there is increasing resistance to paying additional money for course use, from professors and librarians alike.

The last section of the survey focused on business models for an online, themed collection.  Continue reading ‘Librarian Survey Results: Coursepacks and Business Models’

Librarian Survey Results: Themed Collections

This is the fourth post in a 5-part series in which we will share some of the results of our survey for librarians with you. 120 librarians took the survey.

In the section of our survey dealing with the LCRM Online collection, we asked whether online collections/products focused on one particular subject area would become a thing of the past, in an era in which libraries’ federated searching capabilities are rapidly improving. 78% of survey-takers said No.

Continue reading ‘Librarian Survey Results: Themed Collections’

Librarian Survey Results: LCRM Online Collection

This is the third post in a 5-part series in which we will share some of the results of our survey for librarians with you. 120 librarians took the survey.

In the fourth section of our recent librarian survey, we asked for the librarians to share their thoughts on an online collection of scholarly publications on the long civil rights movement.  We described briefly a fully searchable collection of UNC Press LCRM-related books that would grow over time and include books from other university presses.  90% of the survey-takers said that they would use such a service to find and recommend books and articles for patrons. (Check out our LCRM pilot to see what we’ve done with this idea.)

Continue reading ‘Librarian Survey Results: LCRM Online Collection’

Librarian Survey Results: Multilayered and Community Publications

This is the second post in a 5-part series in which we will share some of the results of our survey for librarians with you. 120 librarians took the survey.

In the second section of our recent librarian survey, we asked for the librarians’ opinions about multilayered publications, which we defined as online editions of monographs and scholarly articles that would be enhanced with sidebars, links to multimedia primary sources, and additional comments on the text. 87% of respondents were interested in seeing university presses and libraries collaborate to publish such online editions. Of that interested group, 77% were interested in contributing to such publications. Continue reading ‘Librarian Survey Results: Multilayered and Community Publications’

Librarian Survey Results: LCRM Online Center

This is the first post in a 5-part series in which we will share some of the results of our survey for librarians with you.

During the period October 26, 2009 – April 21, 2010, we made two versions of our survey designed for librarians available. We wish to thank the 120 individuals who took the time to complete the survey. The LCRM project staff is thrilled to have received so many responses. Based on the high level of interest and diverse responses we received, we have drawn some conclusions from the survey which we would like to share with you. Whether or not you have taken the survey, you can join in the conversation by adding your comments to our posts on each topic.

In the first section of the survey, we asked for the librarians’ input on our website. We specifically asked if our website, currently organized as a blog, would be more use to them if it were reorganized and expanded into an LCRM online center. This idea received wide support. 90% of respondents said that such an online center would be useful to them and that they would recommend it on their library websites, in subject guides, and/or in course guides. Continue reading ‘Librarian Survey Results: LCRM Online Center’

Survey Results: The Future of Print

This is the final post in a seven-part series in which we will share some of the results of our survey for scholars with you.

In our recent Faculty Survey, an interesting side debate developed in the scholars’ comments about the future of print. One respondent clearly thought that printed materials would be less important in the future. This respondent said:

–         “This seems to me to be a library or subscription like project.  Printing out is going to wane drastically. Kindle: yes! As for full-text monographs, I’d probably just ask them to buy the book. For a chapter, maybe access on line.”

But a few other scholars had drastically different views on the importance of print. Continue reading ‘Survey Results: The Future of Print’

Survey Results: Business Models

This is the sixth post in a seven-part series in which we will share some of the results of our survey for scholars with you.

In the final section of our recent Faculty Survey, we raised the issue of sustainability for the LCRM project’s proposed online publishing innovations, such as a bibliography, an online collection of LCRM-related content, and an online coursepack service and the importance of establishing effective business models. The scholars were asked whether they agreed or disagreed with several statements about ways the business model could be shaped. While there was no strong agreement on any of the specific issues, most respondent expressed a desire to see the project sustain itself in the long term while remaining “affordable,” which one scholar defined as a packet of online materials costing “the same amount as a published monograph.”

Here are a few things that our respondents said about a business model for the LCRM project: Continue reading ‘Survey Results: Business Models’

Survey Results: Coursepack Service

This is the fifth post in a seven-part series in which we will share some of the results of our survey for scholars with you.

In our recent Faculty Survey, the fifth topic that we asked scholars to give us some feedback about was the creation of a coursepack service. Building on the idea of an online collection, a coursepack service might allow scholars using the collection to aggregate materials together for teaching purposes and make them available as a single packet to students online or in print, with the main focus being on the online component. Interest was high in a coursepack service with 78% of the 279 respondents interested in using the service.

Here’s a sampling of the scholars’ reactions to a coursepack service: Continue reading ‘Survey Results: Coursepack Service’

Survey Results: LCRM Online Collection

This is the fourth post in a seven-part series in which we will share some of the results of our survey for scholars with you.

The fourth section of our survey asked scholars to evaluate the possibility of creating an online collection of LCRM-related works. The proposed collection could consist of either LCRM-related publications or LCRM-related publications along with primary-source documents. Scholars loved this idea with an amazing 96% of the 279 respondents supporting the creation of an online collection of LCRM-related publications and 97% of the 279 respondents requesting the inclusion of primary-source documents in the collection.

Here’s what some of the scholars had to say about an online collection: Continue reading ‘Survey Results: LCRM Online Collection’

Survey Results: Community Publications

This is the third post in a seven-part series in which we will share some of the results of our survey for scholars with you.

In our recent Faculty Survey, the third aspect of the LCRM project that we asked for the scholars’ input on was the idea of “community publications.” Community publications would contain all of the enhancements of multilayered publications (additional asides from the authors, additional sidebars, and links to multimedia primary sources used by the authors that are available on the internet), but they would go a step further by providing a space for conversations and communities to develop around the work to keep the conversation started by the author going after the work has been published. Once again we asked scholars if they were interested in writing or using community publications. Only 56% of the 284 respondents were interested in authoring a community publication, but 82% of the 284 respondents were interested in using community publications.

Continue reading ‘Survey Results: Community Publications’